Genesis 9: Vegetarianism, the Death Sentence and Plaques

A chapter that has interesting implications for vegetarianism!

Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything.

We can only assume that therefore before this everyone was vegetarian, there’s no evidence either way. It seems to be a strange time to be giving man authority to eat animals, when there’s just be a huge flood and there’s at most 14 of each species alive (as preserved in the ark), but God knows what He’s doing.

This is then followed by a passage that has probably been used in the past as biblical support for the death sentence (which I don’t support):

Whoever sheds the blood of man,
by man shall his blood be shed;
for in the image of God
has God made man.

Interesting how that passage is laid out in a somewhat poetic format as well. God then goes on to say that every time there’s a rainbow He will remember His promise to never again flood the whole earth and kill all living creatures. In doing this, God sets a precedent. A precedent of using symbols or landmarks as ways to remember important things. This theme is an extremely strong theme throughout all of human history, though we seldom consciously realise it.

In the bible, and to this day, Jews (and some Christians) celebrate the passover feast to remember when God delivered the Israelites from Egypt, which in turn was symbolic of when God would sacrifice His only Son to save all of us.

In relationships, we celebrate anniversaries and birthdays to remember important dates in our lives.

In modern history we have holidays like Labour Day and (in some countries) Independence Day to remember events of important social change.

In religion we have holidays like St. Patrick’s Day which commemorates the bringing of Christianity to Ireland.

All over the world we have plaques and landmarks to remember important events that have occurred throughout history.

And all this dates back to God’s great landmark of promise: the Rainbow.

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